Archive for the ‘Every Stone a Story’ Category

A Final Tribute

June 23, 2010

John Bush was honored with the placing of the Iron Cross on his grave on June 19, 2010.  It was placed there by the Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest Chapter of the UDC and the Boone County Genealogical Society.

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Iron Cross

June 23, 2010

Jason Winters represented John Bush in the Iron Cross ceremony

Iron Cross

June 23, 2010

The UDC scattered dirt from Mt. Sterling, KY  over the grave of John Bush so that he could finally rest under the soil of his native state.

John Bush

June 23, 2010

John Bush Forage Master

June 22, 2010

John Bush

Forage Master John Bush 10th KY Cavalry

John Bush felt the call to fight for the Confederate States of America and so joined the 10th Kentucky Cavalry Regiment as Forage Master.  He was with his regiment and Brig Gen. John Hunt  Morgan,  at Cynthiana, KY, June 11-13th 1864.  The Confederates first surrounded the town held by Union forces, and drove Col. Conrad Garis and the 168th Ohio Inf. back north.  As the fighting flared in Cynthiana  the 171st Ohio National Guard, commanded by Brig. Gen. Edward Hobson arrived by train, but Morgan and the his forces forced them to surrender.  On June 12th and 13th, additional Union forces under Brig. Gen. Stephen Burbridge attacked Morgan, and the Confederates fled into Mt. Sterling, KY.  There 400 of them were captured and many others killed.  Gen. Morgan escaped, but FM John Bush did not.  He and the other prisoners, were placed on a train headed for Camp Douglas Prison in Chicago.  On July 17th, 1864, the prison-bound train stopped at Thorntown, IN to take on water and FM John Bush attempted to escape.  He was shot and killed with a single shot, and left by the tracks as the train moved onward.  He was buried in an unmarked grave.  No doubt he never heard of the small mid-western town he was killed and buried in.  After the war, a Union soldier, James Ball, a member of Co. D, of the 72nd Indiana Inf., moved to Thorntown.  When he heard the story of John Bush, he bought a military stone out of his own meager earnings and had it engraved and placed on the grave of John Bush.

John Isaacs

October 8, 2009
John and Ruth Isaacs at the grave of John Isaacs

John and Ruth Isaacs at the grave of John Isaacs

 

JOHN R. ISAACS

 

            John Isaacs was born in 1843 in Rockbridge County, Virginia.  He enlisted in Co K of the 11th VA Inf., “The Valley Regulators,” three days after the 1st Battle of Manassas on July 24, 1861.  He fought in all of the 11th Virginia’s battles.  He is listed as present on the June rolls of the 11th VA and as a part of Kemper’s Brigade, he took part in Pickett’s Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 3, 1863.  John’s younger brother, George enlisted in the 11th VA, and joined Co. K. on October 16, 1863.  George was killed at Drury’s Bluff, VA on May 16, 1864.  After the War, John R. Isaacs moved to Parke County, Indiana where he bought a farm and began his new life.  The Isaacs family still owns the farm.  John passed away in 1909 and was buried at the Methodist Cemetery in Waveland.  After the Methodist Cemetery fell into disrepair, John’s son, William moved his father to Maple Ridge Cemetery just north of Waveland where he rests today.

Isaac O’Haver

September 1, 2009

 

Monument of Confederate Bugler at Corsicana, TX

confederate bugler corsicana txconfederate buglerconfederate buglerIsaac ohaver

 

Isaac O’Haver

 

Isaac O’Haver was a member of Co K of the 17th VA Cavalry.  He was a  17 year-old bugler for his unit.  He was born Sep. 20, 1844 and died at the age of 27 on March 30, 1872.  He is buried at the Ladoga Cemetery.

Jonas T. Gish

September 1, 2009

Jonas Gish 1JONAS T. GISH

 

Jonas Gish was one the eleven Confederate soldiers who came to Montgomery County from Botetourt Co., VA.  He enlisted in the Confederate Army at the beginning of the War and was assigned to Co K of the 28th VA Inf.  He is one of seven Confederate soldiers who are buried in Montgomery County who survived Pickett’s Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg.  Gish was born on Oct. 29, 1838 and died on Dec. 2, 1926 at Ladoga.  He is buried in the Ladoga Cemetery.

John Mangus

August 30, 2009

JOHN MANGUS

John Mangus

John Mangus

 

John Mangus moved to Indiana after the war, probably in 1881.  He moved to Ladoga with his wife Sarah and 6 children.  His Great-great-great grandfather was Andreas Mangus, who was a Hessian soldier who came to America to fight the British in the Revolutionary War and stayed after the fighting was over.  John enlisted in the army in 1861 at the beginning of the Civil War and was assigned to Co. E of the 42nd Virginia Infantry.   Company E was called the Dixie Grays.  He served honorably until he was paroled after the surrender at the Appomattox Courthouse, being the only member of Company E to answer the roll call.  The 42nd VA saw action in many battles during the war.  Most notable of which were the 2nd Manassas, Harper’s Ferry, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and finally Gettysburg.  John Mangus was wounded at Antietam and Chancellorsville.  John Chapla, in his history of the 42nd, observed that, “Clearly in the postwar era the surviving members of the Dixie Greys, Co. E of the 42nd Va. Inf., came to believe that he held a special status among the survivors.”  John Mangus died in 1921 and is buried at the Ladoga Cemetery.

 John Mangus

Mark Raines and SHAPE

August 29, 2009

Point Clear 012

One of the goals of the SCV camps is to erect memorial stones honoring Confederate veterans, so we began to search the records and look for stones to see how many of them had Confederate military stones and how many had just civilian stones.  With the help of SHAPE for the South, who have people doing research on Confederate soldiers and their units and who have been doing a great work getting the beautiful white marble stones ordered, we began to tell some amazing stories in words and pictures.